Defending Ron Paul on Crimea

Daniel McAdams smashes Students for Liberty’s Alexander McCobin for towing the neocon line on Crimea against Ron Paul:

How unfortunate that Alexander McCobin, president of Students for Liberty (SFL), decided to write an attack piece on Ron Paul’s non-interventionism while echoing neocon warmongering over the recent referendum held in Crimea. It seems quite a strange move for an organization founded to capitalize on Ron Paul’s groundbreaking 2008 run for the presidency, which brought in masses of young people electrified by Dr. Paul’s message of peace and prosperity.

Why would McCobin want to alienate rank and file Students for Liberty members, who overwhelmingly support Ron Paul? It’s not smart to alienate your base. No wonder his organization quickly took to Twitter to back down from his screed, explaining that, “This is just a statement by individuals — SFL doesn’t have an official stance on foreign policy.”

What is particularly ironic about McCobin’s lecture to Ron Paul on Crimea is that his bill of particulars is so riddled with analytical and factual errors that it actually argues quite eloquently for the opposite of what was intended. In other words his deeply flawed battle cry actually makes Dr. Paul’s case for non-interventionism. If you do not understand what is going on overseas, you should refrain from telling the people there what to do.

Justin Raimondo also took the time to challenge McCobin:

McCobin is wrong about South Ossetia: like the Crimeans, the Ossetians held a referendum and voted to separate from Georgia’s central government. In response, Georgia invaded the region, sending in its troops before the Russians ever got there. They bombarded Tsinskvali, capital of the rebel province, deliberately targeting civilians, killing and wounding hundreds. According to Human Rights Watch, Georgian artillery fired directly into basements – where civilians were sure to be hiding. As the BBC put it:

“The BBC has discovered evidence that Georgia may have committed war crimes in its attack on its breakaway region of South Ossetia in August. Eyewitnesses have described how its tanks fired directly into an apartment block, and how civilians were shot at as they tried to escape the fighting.”

McCobin hasn’t even bothered to do the most basic research: he’s simply swallowed the new cold war mythology whole. It’s easier that way.

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