To Those Claiming God is Anti-Libertarian in the Old Testament

Repost

There are many who claim that whereas Jesus represented love and peace, the God of the OT “was” anti-libertarianism due to his displays of power, taking of life, and guiding the hearts of his created beings. This is a common atheistic or agnostic complaint against those, like us, who are both Christians as well as libertarians. Libertarian in this context importantly refers specifically to those theories of individual property rights. Below are thoughts against this mindset.

BEGIN:

If they claim that the OT Christian God was anti-libertarian, they must assume that this God exists for the sake of their argument. If they assume, even for the sake of the argument, that God exists, they must concede the Christian position that the OT as a whole explains and demonstrates the nature of that God. Therefore, they must also concede that the God of the OT is taught to have ownership of all the earth, if they wish to stay consistent with their first assumption. Further, they must also understand the God owns life and death.

If God owns the world and its inhabitants, then is it not a libertarian principle that he have the legal and moral ability to do with the property and creation what he wills, so long as it is not self-contradictory to his character and nature as a whole? The property owner chooses how to act on his property. If the OT states that this world and creation are God’s, then to assume that the God of the OT exists for the sake of the current argument is also to assume that this God acts well within the libertarian property ownership framework.

Therefore, it is not the conclusion that the anti-Christian hates in his crusade against OT theology, rather, it is the premise (that the God of the OT exists). Unfortunately, his claim that the OT God is anti-libertarian is an improper and illogical claim. They would do well to state their more foundational claim- which is that the God in the OT does not exist.

And this is what Scripture expects them to say, for “the fool says in his heart, there is no God.” (Psalm 14:1)